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Archive for April, 2012

Articles

Explore Mombasa Beaches and the Swahili Cultural experiences

The true way of unwinding your safari in Kenya is to end it in Mombasa, here the wilderness meets the sea. The true heart of Mombasa is found in the exotic old town, among the narrow winding streets and Arab architecture. The air here is always heavy with the scent of spices. Women wearing the traditional bui bui fill the narrow streets and busy markets. At the dhow docks fresh fish and goods from all along the coast arrive daily. The streets are alive with the bright colours of the traditional coastal khanga and kikoy, the all purpose wrap around cloth worn by both men and women. At the waters edge is Fort Jesus, an imposing fort that stands watch over the harbor. Mombasa is a place where both history and progress are greatly valued, where a busy harbor existence is lived at its own unique, tropical pace.

The coastline south of Mombasa is a tropical paradise of palm fringed white sand beaches, where the turquoise waters of the Indian Ocean meet beautiful coral reefs. The protective reefs have created ideal beaches with calm, inviting waters. Days are filled with sunshine and nights are balmy and warm with gentle sea breezes. The offshore reefs are alive with coral, myriad fish, sea turtles and dolphins. Whether you are looking for a base to actively explore this fascinating region, or just somewhere to unwind and find peace, Kenya’s south coast has everything you could wish for.


A wide range of World Class resorts, centred around Diani Beach allow visitors to relax and enjoy this natural paradise with the best standards of accommodation, service and cuisine.The south coast also has many smaller quiet getaways such as Tiwi Beach, ideal for travellers looking for a low key break. Inland, the fertile hinterland of Kwale District consists of small villages inhabited by the Wakamba, Digo and Duruma tribes and you have endless opportunities of visisting their homesteads and learning their culture, taking pictures, dances,Traditional lectures and learning their way of life.

While staying in Mombasa, you have many options of doing side trips, which includes the popular and near by Shimba Hills National Reserve. The reserve is made up of both open grassland and dense rainforest, all with stunning views across the Indian Ocean. The Reserve has a variety of species including Elephant, Giraffe and Buffalo as well as the rare Roan and Sable antelope. The forests are home to a number of unusual species including the Black and White Colobus, Serval cats, Red Duiker and Suni Antelope. An abundance of birdlife lives is found among the hills, including Honey guides, Turacos, woodpeckers and Sunbirds. The Shimba Hills are a natural and peaceful haven, easily accessed from the beaches of the Kenyan coast.

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The Maasai Cricket Warriors

The Maasai Cricket Warriors

Hey have you ever seen the Maasai play cricket?

Well a group of Maasai Warriors in Kenya came together and formed a Cricket team. They call their team “The Maasai Cricket Warriors”

Their main aim was to promote healthy living among their tribe.

The team is made up of Maasai warriors from the Laikipia region of Kenya in Africa. The pictures were taken in March6th in Mombasa Kenya

AFP/Carl de Souza

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A player of the Maasai Warriors cricket team is silhouetted as he plays cricket on the beach in Mombasa, South East Kenya.

Articles

Kenya is the home of Wildlife safaris in Africa

The boundless wilderness, wildlife and big game of this region has long attracted adventure seekers from all over the world. I believe no other African country can boast such an incredible range of landscapes, unique geographical features and species.

Kenya offers the visitor a chance to experience a natural world unchanged by the passage of time. The Kenyan wildlife and wilderness is home to an endless array of ecosystems, the staging ground for natural cycles of life, death and regeneration as old as the planet itself.

This great range of natural habitats means that there is plenty to explore, and plenty of species to encounter face to face.


This is a land of endless potential for the wildlife enthusiast. From great migratory herds of the open savannah to an incredible abundance of birdlife, from the depths of a tropical rainforest to the depths of the Indian Ocean teeming with fish, this a world of natural wonders. A safari into the wilds of Kenya is a journey into nature at its purest. Everywhere you look there is a profusion of life…

Take a Wildlife safari through Kenya with the follwing in mind

  • Track  the mighty great Migration of wildebeests and Zebra’s or track the great predators through pure, unspoilt wilderness.
  • Dive into a world of undersea wonder or step back from the beach and discover a hidden paradise of coastal forests and the swahili culture
  • Trek into forests alive with wildlife, from the treetops to the forest floor among them the Tropical rain forests of western Kenya.
  • In these high wild regions, the forests offer sanctuary for big game, and the thermal currents offer birdlife and butterflies freedom to fly.
  • Flocks of flamingo to hippo hideaways, each of the Rift Valley lakes is a unique natural world fresh water and shallow alkaline lakes.
  • The Northern Frontier of Kenya is a place of vast, unspoilt wilderness and has UNIQUE wildlife like the Long-necked Gerenuk (meaning ‘giraffe neck’), a graceful antelope that stands upright on its hind legs to feed on tall bushes which is among  the Samburu’s “Special Five” – (the reticulated giraffe, longnecked gerenuk, Somali ostrich, Grevy’s zebra and beisa oryx ) never found anywhere else
  • Where else in the world can you find lions, rhino, and more living free and wild within sight of a city skyline that is Nairobi National park

My family and I spend this year’s Easter holiday in Samburu game  and we had what I can simply describe as a wonderful time. We saw Samburu special and meals at our tented camp were  sumptuous and the waiters were friendly and down to earth.

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More on Cultural Safaris in Kenya

Hirola safaris includes most of its safaris with a visit to Maasai  and Samburu Village. Visiting a manyatta or Eng’ang’ is a good way to learn more about Maasai culture and everyday life. There are many manyattas (often called cultural manyattas) in this area that can be visited by tourists. It is worth arranging this through a reputable guide, and a guided visit will probably be much more informative. The best way to experience and learn about the Maasai life is to take a foot safari or organized trek with an experienced Maasai guide. This is a good chance to get to know the area and to spend time among Maasai communities. It is also a great way to experience the bush and the wildlife from a completely different perspective to your own.

Samburu Tribesmen

Although less well known than their Southerly Maasai cousins, with whom they share a language, the Samburu have an equally intricate and fascinating culture.
Ranging across the great Northern plains and ranges south of Lake Turkana, the Samburu are a people both proud and protective of their culture and the ancestral lands to which it binds them. The Samburu have formed an unlikely cultural bond with another tribe of desert nomads, the Rendille.  Most safaris and treks through this region will pass through Samburu lands. It is well worth spending some time learning more about the Samburu and their culture. The best way to do this is to take a camel or walking safari with a local Samburu guide, or to stay in a lodge or camp managed by a Samburu community. More recently, the Samburu have began herding camels and using them as pack animals. The art of camel husbandry was probably acquired from their close relationship with the Rendille and Turkana peoples of the Northern frontier deserts. Their homesteads, ‘Manyattas’ are usually a circular encampment of long, low, rounded houses, created by daubing cattle dung over a framework of sticks.
Articles

Cultural Safaris of Kenya

Kenya has a culture born of countless sources, from the coastal swahili culture to the Northern Frontier of  Njemps tribesmen. This region has been crossed by the paths of a long and complex history. From the prehistoric records of early man to the present day, Kenya has been a land of unending change, contrasts and diversity.
Kenya has drawn on all of these influences to develop its own unique cultural safaris and adventures. This is the nations greatest strength- the ability to blend the best of many worlds into a strong, singular identity. Today, Kenya welcomes the world to its shores, parks and continues to evolve a modern culture that is born of endless variety, and yet purely, proudly Kenyan. We will look be exploring the world renown Maasai and Samburu tribesmen Cultural safaris.

The Maasai 

The Maasai have come to represent Africa at its most primal, a fiercely independent tribe of legendary courage who sternly shun the modern world in favour of traditional rites and customs. The Maasai are undoubtedly one of the most famous traditional cultures on earth if not in Kenya and Africa.
In recent years, the distinctive Maasai beading and decorative jewellrey have become a fashion item in the West, and remain one of the most popular items taken home by visitors to Kenya. So popular has Maasai beading become that many modern functional items, including watchstraps, belts, handbags and even mobile phone covers are being produced in Maasai designs. The Maasai are indeed a truly independent and proud with a culture more complex and interesting than popular imagination would suggest. They once ranged widely across much of Southern and Central Kenya, extending north to Laikipia, and South across the border into Tanzania. Today most of the Maasai population lives throughout the South West of the country.
The Maasai have ancestral ties to the Samburu and the Njemps  in the North Kenya with whom they share a language Maa, from which the name Maasai comes. The Maasai are completely nomadic cattle herders, and it is only very recently that any move towards agriculture has become evident.
Cattle are very important to the Maasai, and are the subject of mystical beliefs and reverence. Maasai mythology tells of a time when the earth and sky were joined together, until they were suddenly torn apart, with only the wild fig trees left as bridges between the two. As a gift to the Maasai, god – called Enkai sent herds of cattle down through these trees to earth. To the Maasai cattle are sacred and a direct gift from the heavens. Grass is also considered a blessing and sacred. When passing a fig tree, it is customary for the Maasai to push handfuls of grass between the roots, as homage to the source of their herds. One of the more common Maasai greetings is “I hope your cattle are well”.
Victory in a lion hunt was always great cause for celebration, and the returning hunters would perform a spectacular dance called the Engilakinoto. This dance is based a deep rhythmic chant accompanied by a exaggerated thrust of the chest. As the dance progresses, moran display their strength with a series of powerful vertical leaps. This dance is a remarkable sight, with gifted moran having been known to leap up to four feet clear of the earth. Similar dances such as the Eoko ( a dance to bless cattle) and the Eoko oo’njorin(a war dance) are cause for the same exuberant displays of strength.

More on cultural Safaris